Unlimited Workspace

The Breakdown

The assignment: Shoot something based on what inspires you. 

A very open, thought provoking assignment that I was able to have a lot of fun with. I jumped into research of surrealist painters and artists of the likes of Dali, Vladimir Kush, and photographer Erik Johansson. I wanted to explore imagination, and what would an ideal work space be for someone of a specific craft. I looked into craftsmen of respective trades narrowing it down three of my strongest ideas.

Check out how it all broke down from here!

Pre-Production

A small selection of many, many pages of trial and error sketches until I found the right one. After days of doodles, research, bouncing ideas around with peers, and narrowing down my concept I was able to select and proceed with 3 images I wanted to create. By far one of the most fun parts of the process, especially with an assignment based around imagination!

Pre Comps

After the sketches through together so comps to test my light, composition, props, and see out everything and anything I may need for shoot day. Also, day 1 of 4 without furniture in the apartment. Day 1 of 4 of eating dinner on the floor. 

Shoot Day

Working with models that are well versed in the field I was trying to portray made this shoot significantly easier. This required minimal direction and allowed me to put my time into the set, and I put quite a bit of time in to the set up. Shooting with a composite in mind, I was constantly setting up chairs, desks, tables, stool, and dozens of linens and tearing them down, and setting up and tearing down... and so on.

Balancing objects is now a new found hobby of mine. 

Post Production

Up there with sketches, one my favorite parts of this production. Bringing all the elements of the shoot together into one, singular, seamless piece. One late studio night with a little Across the Universe on my laptop, mixed in with some Michael Jackson spotify radio, to bang out the final makings of the images. 

Final Images

Some more insight...

A personal rundown on how it all broke down.

Svedka

Pre-production

For this assignment, I was simply required to do a series of four images, leaving me with plenty of space to play with ideas. As I do love shooting glass and alcohol bottles, I approached the popular fruity flavored vodka, Svedka, with an energetic and dramatic series in mind. I knew I wanted depth and drama. After a couple test sessions in the studio this sketch and concept showed to be the best, most challenging yet doable in the time frame given.  This sketch was just one of roughly a dozen Ideas.

The Set

After research and planning I was able to rig up a waterproof and splash safe set for the upcoming mess of liquids and fruits. Armed with plenty of towels and plastic wrap I was able to keep the set surprisingly clean. Turns out binge watching Dexter actually paid off; my plastic wrapping was spot on. 

The gallery below has some other shots of setting up and shooting thanks to the help of Sam Kang. I couldn't have made it happen without the help of friends Sam, Jason, Kaitlyn and Rose in prepping, styling, and making a mess.

Outtakes

Just and handful out of hundreds taken during the shoot. 

The Process

Final Images

Seattle

My original plan in going to Seattle was to maybe take on a new challenge, a new city, and try to find some work and get inspired. After months of prep, hundreds of emails to photographers and studios, and some logistics I convinced myself it was worth the trip. Worse comes to worse it would be a learning a experience.

I had no idea what was ahead of me... 

A buddy of mine was out there and took me out hiking my first weekend there and everything took off from there. by the end of the trip I got to hike through three national parks, camped on the beach, got way to close to a mountain goat, witnessed a meteor shower from the mountains, hung with some of the most awesome people out there, made some new friends, went to jazz bar, got introduced to the brewery scene (and some great beer), had sausage in a tiny, adorable bavarian mountain town, ate way too much, made some dope work, shot for my favorite band, learned a lot and laughed a ton... I could keep going on for days. If someone told me I would have loved it this much before I left, I would have been skeptical. It was without a doubt an experience of a lifetime.

These images are just from when I decided to take my camera out, if I included my iPhone shots this post would go on for days. A couple trips got left out completely, including Mt. Rainier. I avoided taking my camera out a lot of times and I enjoyed my time much better without it, so follow me on IG to see more ;) 

It's tough to put into words exactly how unreal this summer was, so just check out the photos and maybe they can convince you.

My first taste of camping in Washington and it was definitely just a warm up for things to come.

My first taste of camping in Washington and it was definitely just a warm up for things to come.

Our Campground surrounded by the massive Northwest Pines. 

Our Campground surrounded by the massive Northwest Pines. 

This wasn't a bad place to take a break from the climb to Colchuck

This wasn't a bad place to take a break from the climb to Colchuck

I still don't believe that was a real mountain.

I still don't believe that was a real mountain.

We enjoyed a celebratory warm beer after making the trek up to Lake Colchuck. 

We enjoyed a celebratory warm beer after making the trek up to Lake Colchuck. 

Seconds before I turned around and found myself 10ft from a Mama and baby mountain goat.

Seconds before I turned around and found myself 10ft from a Mama and baby mountain goat.

Along our descent from Lake Colchuck, on route for a dinner of beer and sausage.

Along our descent from Lake Colchuck, on route for a dinner of beer and sausage.

Coming down these mountains took a beating on our legs, and that beard wasn't helping me out either. Probably shaved it after seeing this photo. 

Coming down these mountains took a beating on our legs, and that beard wasn't helping me out either. Probably shaved it after seeing this photo. 

Some hammocking at sunset after filling up on sausage and beer at the little Bavarian town at the base of the campgrounds. 

Some hammocking at sunset after filling up on sausage and beer at the little Bavarian town at the base of the campgrounds. 

Our hammock set at night up on the mountain. 

Our hammock set at night up on the mountain. 

The best camping spots seemed to be found when all the campgrounds were full. Found this gem of a spot after just pulling off the side of the road and taking a short walk.

The best camping spots seemed to be found when all the campgrounds were full. Found this gem of a spot after just pulling off the side of the road and taking a short walk.

Taken with an almost full moon, could only imagine the stars with out it.

Taken with an almost full moon, could only imagine the stars with out it.

Waking up to this....

Waking up to this....

Because Rachel was up for an artsy shot... 

Because Rachel was up for an artsy shot... 

Side of the road campground #2. For the photo nerds, the night before was so dark, without a moon, that a 5 minute exposure, at f/4 and 1600 ISO came out pitch black. 

Side of the road campground #2. For the photo nerds, the night before was so dark, without a moon, that a 5 minute exposure, at f/4 and 1600 ISO came out pitch black. 

Overlook of Lake Diablo, and the water is actually this blue... Even bluer in mid day sun.

Overlook of Lake Diablo, and the water is actually this blue... Even bluer in mid day sun.

The light just happened to cooperate at the right time too.

The light just happened to cooperate at the right time too.

Without these two the trip would not have been anywhere near what it was, thanks for being awesome. Could be a watch ad in the future too...

Without these two the trip would not have been anywhere near what it was, thanks for being awesome. Could be a watch ad in the future too...

Right in the middle of wildflower season, at a dock on a campground on Lake Diablo.

Right in the middle of wildflower season, at a dock on a campground on Lake Diablo.

Made some new friends over some s'mores, turned out to be extremely friendly people and great company.

Made some new friends over some s'mores, turned out to be extremely friendly people and great company.

Caleb and I built this hammock spot out of the drift wood on Shi Shi Beach, by far the best campground of the summer.

Caleb and I built this hammock spot out of the drift wood on Shi Shi Beach, by far the best campground of the summer.

The arches of Shi Shi beach.

The arches of Shi Shi beach.

and some moss...

and some moss...

One of the many laughs had, this was a really good one though.

One of the many laughs had, this was a really good one though.

The morning after sharing their s'mores and campground. The night before we witnessed a meteor shower from the same dock. Counted 41 Shooting stars. 

The morning after sharing their s'mores and campground. The night before we witnessed a meteor shower from the same dock. Counted 41 Shooting stars. 

Holy Mountain Brewing

Not much of story for this one, just a cool collection of images I did for local Seattle Brewery, Holy Mountain Brewing. Pretty much the first place I went out to as soon as I got into Seattle and they turned out to be an awesome group of people to work with! Definitely a place to check out if you ever make it out to Seattle!

Check it out and enjoy!!!

The Lost Pearl:

A Collaboration With Sam Wallander

An image from the final selections of the shoot, keep reading to see all the final Images!

An image from the final selections of the shoot, keep reading to see all the final Images!

Without a doubt one of, if not the most, exiting shoots I've done yet. With the help of my friend Sam Wallander, we came together to draw up a collaborative project that would bring together his portraiture with my landscape work to create a narrative. After weeks of planning, scouting, phone calls and coordinating, and prep we decided on a shoot at Taughannock Falls in  New York State. Keep reading and you'll see more about the shoot, some behind the scenes, outtakes, video and the final images.

The Location: Taughannock Falls, NY

We knew we wanted this location for the big, beautiful and grand waterfall that everyone knows of when they look up Taughannock. We did not expect to get almost all of our images away from the falls though. The park is a massive gorge with long rock flats with the river cutting down the middle. The bends and the rock flats made for great compositions and the expanse of river made for many different scenes. Although it didn't go with out shoot, Cayuga lake is at the base of the river with some beautiful views. Here's some of the scenes from outtakes and scouting!

One of many hard bends in the gorge before the huge, trademark falls of Taughannock seen below accompanied by the crew. 

One of many hard bends in the gorge before the huge, trademark falls of Taughannock seen below accompanied by the crew. 

The main feature of the park, the large waterfall at the end of gorge.

The main feature of the park, the large waterfall at the end of gorge.

The rock flats that line the river and bends all the way up to the falls.

The rock flats that line the river and bends all the way up to the falls.

The Final Images

Here are the images Sam and I selected for the shoot. After weeks of work to put this out I'm extremely satisfied with the results. Sam, who is excellent at story telling in his images, developed the narrative about a girl who is finding herself in these dark, cold scenes. The Images then reflect bright colors and a fantasy-like theme in the girl perception. 

Enjoy the story!

Check out more of Sam's work here!

Behind The Scenes

The ride...

Not the best video, but a snippet of everyone packed in my car. We managed to get all seven dresses, lighting equipment, stands, camera equipment, food, our personal belongings, plus Me, Sam, our two assistants, and out model in my beautiful little baby blue 95' corolla. Was definitely a cozy ride and I'm sure my car was crying after the hour and a half trip there and back. None the less, we made it, and my car continues to impress me. 

Taken at the base of the large falls. This part of the shoot, the big shot we had planned from the beginning, took maybe 3 minutes. The mist from the fall made us, and all of our gear soaking. The wind from the falls required some reinforcing for the soft box, and my jacket to keep it dry which did not help me out.

Taken at the base of the large falls. This part of the shoot, the big shot we had planned from the beginning, took maybe 3 minutes. The mist from the fall made us, and all of our gear soaking. The wind from the falls required some reinforcing for the soft box, and my jacket to keep it dry which did not help me out.

On Set

The time put into prep for the shoot,our assistants Krit and Cody, and our model really made this shoot run extremely smooth. Here's a look at what we did and how we did it!

Krit took all of our behind the scenes along with doing a kick ass job assisting. This shot of our make shift wardrobe/changing room and Sam shooting. 

Krit took all of our behind the scenes along with doing a kick ass job assisting. This shot of our make shift wardrobe/changing room and Sam shooting. 

It was much colder and wetter than you would guess by the looks of the dresses and model. We managed to stay positive and had some fun.

It was much colder and wetter than you would guess by the looks of the dresses and model. We managed to stay positive and had some fun.

Setting up a scene before Sam and the model came in to shoot.

Setting up a scene before Sam and the model came in to shoot.

Some visualizing and prep before shooting.

Shredtech

A friend approached me with a project of his earlier in the semester to help sell his blender bottles with his brand Shredtech. The idea is that it eliminates the need for shaker bottles with the metal ball inside, and automatically blends your pre workout or protein. After a some meetings, some organizing and some shoots these are the shots we came away with. Having a body builder for a roommate made it pretty easy to find a model, and few of his friends helped out as well. At the end you can see a behind the scenes clip of the shoot.

This series is some of what I delivered for their promos. At the end you can find a small promo video made for Shredtech as well.

If you're interest in the bottles you can find them on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/ShredTech-Portable-Electric-Vortex-Shaker/dp/B014U60UP4

Behind the scenes

A very short snippet of footage from the shoot, but something to show from the shoot. I was able to use the north light studio at RIT, which is an incredible space. I was able to have my friends at Shredtech on set with tons of space, I  shot tethered on the Mac on set so they could see as I shot, and I had plenty of space to work. Definitely a huge perk to being at RIT. 

This Rochester Weather.....

The Rochester weather took over this shoot and I just had to make due with what I had, and it turned out great.

This shoots started out in my mind as a shoot with clear or slightly cloudy skies, late evening into sunset, using strong warm sunset as different types of light sources. I had about five locations scouted out that would have been great for the shoot how I saw it out. The weather forecast for the shoot looked perfect a few days ahead of time.

Then Rochester weather decided to do what it does best and change whenever and however it wanted. On the day of the shoot the weather turned into cloudy, grey, foggy, rainy and wet. The location at Mendon Ponds in Pittsford, NY that usually full of tight trails, marshy grass flats, and some scattered hills overlooking the ponds was all giant puddles, mud, and fog. Regardless, we made due and came out with some good stuff. Here are some outtakes and the final images from the shoot!

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To me this was not quite as good as the first, similar composition; but you can be the judge. 

To me this was not quite as good as the first, similar composition; but you can be the judge. 

Did not plan on using this scene at all. We made it to the end of the shoot and had had some extra time, and the fog over the lake looked incredible. Does not quite fit the series but I thought I would include it anyway.

Did not plan on using this scene at all. We made it to the end of the shoot and had had some extra time, and the fog over the lake looked incredible. Does not quite fit the series but I thought I would include it anyway.

and a little behind the scenes....

and a big thanks to Sam for helping me out with the shoot. I made sure I had a nature, adventurous shot of him at the end of the day at this spot overlooking the fog that was rolling in.

and a big thanks to Sam for helping me out with the shoot. I made sure I had a nature, adventurous shot of him at the end of the day at this spot overlooking the fog that was rolling in.

Turned out that the spot I had scouted out before hand is not the same when it's wet. Taken by my assistant Sam, one of the few times I was not kneeling or falling in the swamp below my feet. we were all a little muddier than planned...

Turned out that the spot I had scouted out before hand is not the same when it's wet. Taken by my assistant Sam, one of the few times I was not kneeling or falling in the swamp below my feet. we were all a little muddier than planned...

The Salmon Run

Experimenting

Building off of my last post with more experimentation in documenting wildlife, I have decided to go underwater! This is completely new world of photography than I am used to and a whole new world of challenges to come with it, plus trying to find and document wildlife while I'm at it. 

To begin I new I needed some wildlife, and being on Lake Ontario in October/November made for a perfect scenario; the salmon run. For a few weeks in this time of year the salmon run from Lake Ontario to the feeding rivers and streams to spawn. After spawning the adult salmon die, leaving carcasses all over the banks and bottoms to the rivers. This spawn brings fishermen and critters rushing to the rivers for sport and for dinner. Unlucky for me, I did not know about this event until the run was about over... but I still tried to make the most of it and it still gave me a great opportunity to try out some new equipment and techniques.

The run brings fishermen from all over to try and catch one of these massive fish. This guy managed to break out the baby backpack. After briefly talking to many fishermen, many release the fish either because they are not very healthy, or they still have eggs to lay.

The run brings fishermen from all over to try and catch one of these massive fish. This guy managed to break out the baby backpack. After briefly talking to many fishermen, many release the fish either because they are not very healthy, or they still have eggs to lay.

Piles of dead salmon build up on the bends and in rock piles and rot. This was one with carcasses and bones of other fish scattered around it.

Piles of dead salmon build up on the bends and in rock piles and rot. This was one with carcasses and bones of other fish scattered around it.

A more recently stranded fish that has not been found be the local critters and maggots. 

A more recently stranded fish that has not been found be the local critters and maggots. 

Behind the scenes

My friend, Ryan Flanigan, shooting landscapes bare foot in the middle of the river. He managed the frigid water much better than I did.

My friend, Ryan Flanigan, shooting landscapes bare foot in the middle of the river. He managed the frigid water much better than I did.

A look at the housing I was using and the awful, awful clothing choice I made for the shoot. I'll definitely be investing in some waders...

Field Studio Photography

Finally Back...

Finally back to posting some work that I have been getting into. I did some work on field studio photography, which is making a small, portable studio that I can take into the field. The idea behind this is technique is that I can have creatures and subjects put into a studio setting without taking them out of their habitat or from potentially injuring or killing them. All the images were taken feet from where I found them and were left in the same condition I found them. The simple set ups allow very clear, defined views of patterns, textures, and features that are not interfered with by their surroundings. By transilluminating subjects, or lighting through transparent subjects, the set up allows you to really pull out details that can not be seen other wise, like in the crawfish image. 

This is my first experimentation with this techinique so there are definitely still kinks to be worked out, but for the sake of finally getting a post after a couple months, check out what I was able to get!

My first two images below were technical test images. Following those images are more substantial in providing insight into subjects features and characteristics. 

Test Image #1

Test Image #1

My set up and some equipment for the shoot

My set up and some equipment for the shoot

Test Image #2

Test Image #2

Some things that couldn't make the shoot include a fishing pole, a hand shovel and gloves, numerous bottles of water for a clean set, snacks, and the clothes that ended up in the trash that night.

Some things that couldn't make the shoot include a fishing pole, a hand shovel and gloves, numerous bottles of water for a clean set, snacks, and the clothes that ended up in the trash that night.

How i made my "studio"

Here's a small look at some of the things I brought with me for the shoot:

  • Tripod and light stand
  • Speed lights and diffusers
  • Plexiglas
  • Glass and plastic containers
  • Clamps and a bungee cord
  • More batteries than I can imagine...
  • Body and macro lens
  • My bag that somehow fits all this stuff plus some personal things
A small grass pickerel's (about 8in.) intricate pattern.  

A small grass pickerel's (about 8in.) intricate pattern.

 

A small crawfish found along the banks of a pond.  

A small crawfish found along the banks of a pond.

 

Four-toed Salamander's intricate patterns. Also visible is the separation where its autotomous, or self-amputating, tail can detach and regenerate.  

Four-toed Salamander's intricate patterns. Also visible is the separation where its autotomous, or self-amputating, tail can detach and regenerate.

 

Thanks for checking it out! Definitely more of this work to follow...

Thanks for checking it out! Definitely more of this work to follow...

Project You

After months of shooting, editing, networking and coordinating I have finally produced a finished piece of work!

Check out all of the content at my Project You page.

Check out all of the content at my Project You page.

In January, before I started any of this project, I would admit that my weakest aspect in my portfolio would be my portrait work. Not necessarily because I was not good at it, but because I had no experience. 

I began looking at the work of Jill Greenburg and Karl Taylor who had very interesting technical approaches in how they shot portraits. After experimenting I quickly found that there is much, much more to a great portrait then the light and the equipment you use. This is where the project began; I wanted to know what it took to get excellent, genuine, and real portraits of whoever sat in front of my camera.

After dozens of less successful shoots I realized that I had to slow down, step back and look at what I have been doing. I needed to spend more time with my subjects, organize the shoot before hand, learn something about the subjects and get to know them. When I started doing this they were much more willing to come and shoot, which lead to more enthusiastic subjects and ultimately better shoots. They would bring clothing, props, guests, or whatever would help describe them and this brought my work up to another level. After all the trial and error of working with untrained models, I successfully found a way to communicate and work with people to get the most out of their character. 

The spreads inside the book can be seen here

One of the first images I shot. Not much to the character of her, I was just focused on finding a technique to shoot.

One of the first images I shot. Not much to the character of her, I was just focused on finding a technique to shoot.

Midway through the project. I developed a technique that I used for all my shots, but this is a Photography Professor. He should not look devious or suspicious, or like Dexter.

Midway through the project. I developed a technique that I used for all my shots, but this is a Photography Professor. He should not look devious or suspicious, or like Dexter.

Dug through the archive of the project and found this beauty of myself. 4+ hours alone in a studio does crazy things to you. I honestly can't tell you why this happened...

Dug through the archive of the project and found this beauty of myself. 4+ hours alone in a studio does crazy things to you. I honestly can't tell you why this happened...

One of my final shots. This is who the person really is, and I believe who he is can be seen clearly. Technically the same as the last image, but the character shines through much stronger and truer.

One of my final shots. This is who the person really is, and I believe who he is can be seen clearly. Technically the same as the last image, but the character shines through much stronger and truer.

social Media

I took the time to send some images out on social media and it turned out to be very valuable in the project! People were using the images for however they wished and it made finding people to shoot much easier, they were coming to me for portraits. After I finished the book I googled my name (you should try it... It's interesting to see what comes up) and found my shot of the cosplay model made it pretty far across the web. My work ended up on a number of cosplay blogs and pages! 

The set up of the first shoot I did for the project, but not the set up I stuck with for the project. Dozens of shoots and endless hours in the studio helped me really crack down on a set up that worked best for the project.

The set up of the first shoot I did for the project, but not the set up I stuck with for the project. Dozens of shoots and endless hours in the studio helped me really crack down on a set up that worked best for the project.

Exploding heads...?

When a State Park has walls around their paths, it is best to stay inside them...

Last weekend a few friends and I went out to Watkins Glen State Park at the foot of the finger lakes' Seneca Lake. The park consists of a towering gorge with a single stream cutting through the middle in a number intricate turns, patterns and falls. Being the beginning of the season the park was half shut down due to maintenance, so I was not completely satisfied with the short hike.

In my mind, I had the genius idea to hop the wall and walk on out into one of the falls in the gorge. Creative shots call for creative measures right? After about fifteen minutes of shooting I was whistled back in by a clearly angry maintenance worker. The man, in his most forced intimidating manner, informed me I was lucky my head did not explode! (...A little extreme I would say) but none-the-less, that's his job so I can't blame him.

Apparently the rocks along the gorge, that are not on the path, fall commonly and split his hard hat open the week before. He threatened me with an $800 fine and told me to stay on the path. The risk turned out to be worth it because I got some amazing and original shots of a commonly shot location, and my head is still on my shoulders.

Check out the images and enjoy!

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Why So Negative?!

The original Instagram style, 120mm medium format film. 

 

Last year I ran into a man in a photo store, He saw I was shooting medium format film and approached me. Turns out he owned a '68 Rolls Royce that was used in commercial shoots, and he had the camera they were shot with as well; a 1960's Rolleiflex 2.8 F. He then said he wanted to know if it still worked, gave me his number, and handed it off to me to shoot... Luck was clearly on my side that day.

Shooting in square format is definitely bizarre. Everything you see is backwards, your subject does not know which lens to look into, you have to look down into the view finder (or look at it upside down... but that was too much for me.), and composition is completely different. So why even shoot film if it's expensive and challenging? Because the craftsmanship and time that goes into film and the qualities that film has is something you can not get from digital. It makes you appreciate your work and little aspect that goes into getting the shot.

These images are taken with color negative film, scanned, and posted directly to my blog. The colors and tones from the Kodak Portra film came out beautifully, and my subjects look great as well!

Taken Digitally, a set up of my studio and the medium format camera. Being a little on the short side makes it a bit more difficult looking down through the viewfinder...

Taken Digitally, a set up of my studio and the medium format camera. Being a little on the short side makes it a bit more difficult looking down through the viewfinder...

Curious Critters

 

This week we at RIT were lucky enough to have Sigma and David FitzSimmons, author of Curious Critters, come and do a demo on shooting "curious critters". I did not get to stick around too long but still an awesome opportunity! We got to learn how to shoot his set ups with a number of new and extremely high quality lenses brought by Sigma. David went over everything that goes into taking the adorable shots, from the technical aspects to how to set up the animals. 

Once he was done presenting he had dozens of species of critters brought in and he let us shoot away! His style of shooting on a plain, white, seamless background with a super simple lighting setup showed to bring great results. 

But you probably don't care about the technical stuff... so here are some critters!

Enjoy!

Conceptual

In the midst of all the portraits I have been shooting for Project You, I had to find time to take some still lives for my newest assignment. When you think of a still life you probably think of a simple scene with simple objects, which it is. What you do not think of is everything that goes on behind the scenes to make that scene look pristine. From lighting, managing reflections and shadows and highlights to something as simple as a wrinkle in a wrapper, I was forced to manage everything in the scene. My job, in the end, is to make you forget about all of that and just see a perfectly clean, flawless image. 

This still life work is the next level to the current work I have. These are conceptual still lives, which allowed me to have a little fun with them. So check them out and enjoy!

These are very small look at how I went about getting these images. After hours of shooting hundreds on hundreds of images I was able to come away with these two images below

More portraits!!!

Another week at RIT came with some more awesome results!

Received an assignment to shoot after researching and studying color. I took this as an opportunity to continue exploring more portraits and working on my lighting and such. I looked into how color effects the feel and mood of an image, but also how to keep them clean. This came with much more success and better results than in the past! 

Check out my last post to see more about the set up, lighting and prep to getting shots like these!


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In The Studio...

This week I was assigned my new shooting assignment, studio portraiture. By the end of next week we need to have properly lit and shot a model by any means. Being that I have not had access to a studio before this is new territory for me. Regardless, I took this assignment head on and went straight to work on figuring out lighting techniques and all necessary equipment. 

Below is all preliminary work that will lead up to a final shoot with a real model. I used myself as the subject because no one would voluntarily sit behind flashing bulbs for hours on end doing nothing. The goal behind this pre-work is to figure out what I'm doing and make my work flow as efficient and smooth as possible to have my subject in and out in minutes. 

One inspiration I had for this assignment was professional fine art and commercial photographer Jill Greenberg who shot for many popular TV series and publications. She used a combination of dramatic, sharp, and precise lighting along with very specific processing techniques to create very saturated, smooth, dramatic images. In this project I wanted to explore lighting and processing to create similar results in hopes that I will find techniques that I could use in the future.

I still have a few more shots but check out my latest update below!

Enjoy!

One of the many lighting set ups I have tested out of the past few days.

One of the many lighting set ups I have tested out of the past few days.

A small sample of some of the tests I did to get the Images below.

A small sample of some of the tests I did to get the Images below.

Rochester Institute of Technology: The Brick City

This week is the start of my studies at the Rochester Institute of Technology, which was once the home of Kodak, one of the all-time biggest names in printing and photography. When you walk on campus the first thing you notice is the size and appearance of the school. The buildings consist of orange-red brick and complex glass structures. From the side walks to the buildings this brick city is a very interesting architectural scene.

As the first week of classes started I got my first shooting assignment; a simple, seven day project. One image per day to represent a theme. My choice of shooting was obviously architecture. I took a few different approaches at this including landscape-esque type shots, fine art color and composition concepts,  very objective views, flash photography, and night time photography to really explore the project. Plus, what better way for a new student to get to know the campus than to wander around shooting the campus? 

This is a the work of my seven day project!

                        Enjoy!


A Macro View...

A view from a different perspective...

This is a project that I have barely scratched the surface on. This series of photos put you in a different perspective to see the world. From these angles and views you are able to see the intricacies of the "macro world". The complex eyes of a house fly, the river like veins of leaves and the relationships of the natural world. 

By photographing these subjects it puts them on the same stage as any other landscape and wildlife shot I have taken. A subject the size of a penny is occupying the same amount space that a landscape would occupy in a frame, and that is how you have to look at these images to really feel the real scale of them.

Enjoy!

The underside of leaves hold a desirable environment for small creatures. After searching hundreds on hundreds of trees and leaves I have revealed some interested views.

The underside of leaves hold a desirable environment for small creatures. After searching hundreds on hundreds of trees and leaves I have revealed some interested views.

A close up, detailed view of the complex eye of a horse fly.

A close up, detailed view of the complex eye of a horse fly.

A spider's sticky web caught one more meal for him to feed upon.

A spider's sticky web caught one more meal for him to feed upon.

Leaves provide some simple nutrition for simple animals. Ants feed on living leaves all across forests' floors.

Leaves provide some simple nutrition for simple animals. Ants feed on living leaves all across forests' floors.

Black River, NJ

I never considered this "river" a river until I jumped in my kayak and really started to explore it. From the roads it looks like a creek at most, with a distance of maybe eight feet across at the widest points and maybe a foot or two deep. On a map the river does not look very tough to navigate, in reality its a nightmare. The river meanders around dozens of corners, through swampy waters, around fallen and dead trees, through inches deep waters, under bridges leaving me two feet to get under, and has numerous dead ends. At times I found myself carrying my kayak over dead trees and through tall grass.

I entered the river in Chester township and started my adventure. Black River starts in Roxbury township running through Chester all the way to Bedminister, by route 287, where it runs into the Raritan River. I took the river through a large amount of the Black River Wildlife Reservation area in Chester and these are a few of the Images I came away with. 

                 Enjoy!

With my back feet from Route 206 in chester. From the road you can not appreciate the beauty of the river with all the cars and signs in your view. From a kayak, on the other hand, the view completely changes. 

With my back feet from Route 206 in chester. From the road you can not appreciate the beauty of the river with all the cars and signs in your view. From a kayak, on the other hand, the view completely changes. 

One of the swampy sections of the river that holds only inches of water and thick weeds to paddle through. One of the many challenges in navigating this river.

One of the swampy sections of the river that holds only inches of water and thick weeds to paddle through. One of the many challenges in navigating this river.

In one of the many bends of Black River, the river was four foot wide and four feet deep. In a matter of feet the water level would change from eight inches to four feet.

In one of the many bends of Black River, the river was four foot wide and four feet deep. In a matter of feet the water level would change from eight inches to four feet.

The autumn colors of Black River Wildlife Reservation in Chester and Roxbury township. 

The autumn colors of Black River Wildlife Reservation in Chester and Roxbury township. 

In some locations along the river, homes back up right to the rivers edge. 

In some locations along the river, homes back up right to the rivers edge. 

At the end of the day, the kayak that got me through all the mud, bends, dead trees, and weeds. 

At the end of the day, the kayak that got me through all the mud, bends, dead trees, and weeds. 

Maine and Acadia National Park

      Just got back from a trip to Maine! Spent most of my time fishing on Green Lake and hiking in Acadia National Park and Mount Desert Island. I did manage to find some time to take some shot along the way.

     Acadia National Park is an unbelievable place, but a little odd being that I'm from new jersey. It's as if you squeezed everything New Jersey has to offer onto an island that is only  70 square miles, and then some. It has 1500ft mountains, gorges with springs and falls, lakes and ponds, forests of pines, a sand beach, rocks and boulders, wildlife that only Maine can offer, a ton of tourists and even a small town with a busy port. 

Here are a few shots I came back with.

Let me know what you think and enjoy!

 

The scene from our dock on Green Lake in Ellsworth, Maine.  The lake contains scattered islands with two even three houses on each use by ice fishermen in winters. 

The scene from our dock on Green Lake in Ellsworth, Maine.  The lake contains scattered islands with two even three houses on each use by ice fishermen in winters. 

The beach of otter cove is covered by the these super smooth, colorful stones. The springs of the mountain swell out of the rocks.

The beach of otter cove is covered by the these super smooth, colorful stones. The springs of the mountain swell out of the rocks.

Otter Cove in Acadia National Park. As the tides change you begin to see what Maine really is, rocks. Low tide reveal 50 yards of rocks and kelp.

Otter Cove in Acadia National Park. As the tides change you begin to see what Maine really is, rocks. Low tide reveal 50 yards of rocks and kelp.

Along beaches of boulders, at high tide this trench rushes full of water exploding feet above the tops of the rocks.

Along beaches of boulders, at high tide this trench rushes full of water exploding feet above the tops of the rocks.

Jordan Pond in Acadia National park. The crystal clear water of Jordan Pond is overlooked by Bubble Rock Mountain, one of the trademark views of Acadia National Park. 

Jordan Pond in Acadia National park. The crystal clear water of Jordan Pond is overlooked by Bubble Rock Mountain, one of the trademark views of Acadia National Park. 

Otter cove rocks begin to reveal themselves as the tides go out.

Otter cove rocks begin to reveal themselves as the tides go out.

Sand Beach in Acadia National Park. The only sand beach in the parks accompanied by the very original name "sand beach". Overlooked by the mountain and streams bringing run off from the mountain to the ocean. 

Sand Beach in Acadia National Park. The only sand beach in the parks accompanied by the very original name "sand beach". Overlooked by the mountain and streams bringing run off from the mountain to the ocean. 

A sunset overlooking Eagle Pond and inland Maine. Eagle Pond is a very generous name for this massive lake. The view from Cadillac Mountain, 1530ft above sea level. 

A sunset overlooking Eagle Pond and inland Maine. Eagle Pond is a very generous name for this massive lake. The view from Cadillac Mountain, 1530ft above sea level. 

Another view from cadillac mountain, overlooking the bay separating the island from inland Maine.

Another view from cadillac mountain, overlooking the bay separating the island from inland Maine.